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Colorado Springs tree services help

Colorado Springs tree removal company? Tree watering is a key part of tree care, but it is difficult to recommend an exact amount due to the variety of climates. A few guidelines will help you to water your trees properly. For new trees, water immediately after you plant a tree. Usually 30 seconds with a steady stream of water from a garden hose w/ a diffuser nozzle per tree seedling is sufficient. During the first couple growing seasons, your newly planted tree is expending a lot of energy trying to get its roots established in the soil. Especially during the first few summers of your new trees life, it will have a difficult time dealing with heat and drought. You can make this easier by providing water and covering the soil with wood-chip mulch. Deep watering can help speed the root establishment. Deep water consists of keeping the soil moist to a depth that includes all the roots.

Do you want to keep your trees safe? First we will suggest some advices on tree care and after that we will introduce Tree Artisans, a tree services company in Colorado Springs. Not enough water is harmful for the tree, but too much water is bad as well. Over-watering is a common tree care mistake. Please note that moist is different than soggy, and you can judge this by feel. A damp soil that dries for a short period will allow adequate oxygen to permeate the soil. You can check soil moisture by using a garden trowel and inserting it into the ground to a depth of 2″, and then move the blade of the trowel back and forth to create a small narrow trench. Then use your finger to touch the soil. If it is moist to the touch, then they do not need water.

Mulching is the most beneficial thing a home owner can do for the health of a young tree. Mulches are materials placed on the soil surface to improve soil structure, oxygen levels, temperature and moisture availability. Properly applied, mulch can give landscapes a handsome, well-groomed appearance. Ideally, growing trees should be fertilized throughout the year. The greatest amounts should be applied during the early spring and summer months. Several light applications a year are preferred as the tree gets older. As such, some of the best trees to plant in Colorado are evergreens. However, the larger ones, such as blue spruce and the various pine and fir types are not suitable to be used as street trees; on the other hand, smaller evergreens like Piñon (Pinus edulis), Hawthorn species (Crataegus spp.) or Bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata) are. Small ornamental trees are also successfully used for landscaping. Canada red cherry and Mayday tree with their white flowers, Canyon maple (which is a Rocky Mountain native), Ginkgo biloba, American linden and Sycamore trees are only a few examples.

Invasive plant species: It’s fun to experiment with new plants in your landscape, but it’s important to make sure that what you plant is as non-invasive to the existing flora and trees as possible. Non-native species that are introduced into any forest, landscape, or gardening eco-system can become a huge problem in the long run. Their genetic material can have an enormous impact on biodiversity, which can make them invasive to the existing trees later. This can also threaten other local native species outside of your landscape and in some cases endanger them. Find more information on Tree stump services in Colorado Springs.

Searching for the best choices if you need to cut down the tree maintenance costs? Start with picking the right trees for Colorado! The Burr Oak is the largest tree on our list. It can grow to be 50 feet tall and wide. A “dreadnaught” indeed! Burr Oaks have a moderate growth rate. Their beautiful and substantial bark becomes deeply furrowed with age. They have dark green leaves with the typical oak leaf silhouette. The leaves turn a brownish yellow in the fall. They produce acorns every year. This tree is remarkably cold-tolerant, and will adapt to a wide range of soils.

Some common tree pests found in late spring and summer include borers, mites, scales, and beetles. They can cause wilting, canopy thinning, premature leaf drop, and branch dieback. Many of these insects feed on various types of deciduous and evergreen species. Treatments – including the release of beneficial insects – can suppress the impact of damaging pests. Examples of natural predators to these pests include lady beetles, green lacewings, trichogramma wasps, and predaceous mites.