If you travel to Singapore you may want to check this incredible new tourist activity in Singapore. While you are there you can smell one iconic fragrance that was re-launched recently: Singapore Girl perfume. It did not take long for her fragrance to become popular. In fact, in the early 1970s, Perfumes of Orient and another massive perfume business called Perfumes of Singapore, owned by her soon to be next husband, Mr. Dadi Balsara, merged to become Perfumes of Singapore Pte Ltd. There were at least two factories that produced thousands of this perfume each month, and it was sold both domestically and internationally. In 1997, Singapore Girl perfume became the top prize offered at the Singapore Manufacturer Association as well.

You have to keep in mind that there is a strong connection between fragrances and memory. When you smell Singapore Girl your brain connects you with warm, and positive memories such as the smell of your mother or grandmother. Because of the memories, the scent invokes. Who doesn’t remember when Mister Dadi signed these iconic bottles? Ask your parents and grandparents and let them tell you how Singapore Girl Perfume was an important part of their lives. Connecting yourself to these memories is easily obtainable by wearing Singapore Girl Perfume.

The name is derived from Greek acris (locust) and opsis (resembling). They are common in low- land forests and on roadside trees throughout Southeast Asia. Ants often build gardens around its pseudobulbs, because lipids on the seed coats of the orchid attract ants that assist in their dispersal. A decoction of the leaves and roots was used as an antipyretic in Malaya (Ridley 1907; – Head of Singapore Botanical Garden and Burkill 1935). In Indonesia, juice from the pseudobulbs was dropped into the ear to cure earache or tinnitus, and pulverised pseudobulb was plastered on the head or abdomen to treat fever and hypertension. Roots are used for treating rheumatism in the Western Ghats in India. Find extra details on Best scent for her Singapore.

Take a walk on the wild side as you step foot on one of Singapore’s most popular off-shore islands. A sprawling 1,020 hectares, Ubin boasts lush greenery and abundant wildlife, drawing nature lovers and outdoor enthusiasts to explore the many wonders of the granite island. There are plenty of activities to get up to here: go birdwatching at Pekan Quarry, wander through nature trails, and hike 75 metres up Puaka Hill for a breathtaking panoramic view of the islet.

Singapore’s Merlion is just what it sounds like – the figure of a mythical creature that has the head of a lion and the body and tail of a fish. The Merlion represents the city’s humble start as a fishing village combined with its traditional Malay name Singapura – “lion city.” The structure, which was relocated to Merlion Park in 2002, where it can overlook Marina Bay, weighs 70 tonnes and stands at 8.6 meters tall, spouting water from its mouth in a fountain. The “Merlion Cub” sits nearby, only two meters tall but a hefty three tonnes, and there are five additional official Merlion statues throughout the city. Merlion Park is an ideal spot for photo-ops, whether you are taking a selfie in front of the iconic creature or capturing the magnificent views from the park as it looks out over the bay.

The most adrenalin-inducing thing to do in Singapore has got to be the G-Max Reverse Bungy, Singapore’s first ever bungy. Get launched skywards at 200 km per hour to a height of 60 metres and bounce for approximately 5 minutes. The experience is not unlike being an astronaut in a rocket launch as you sit in an open-sided ‘capsule’. Also, for a few extra dollars, riders get a T-shirt and a DVD recording of themselves in action, taken by an onboard camera. Discover even more info at https://singapore-memories.com/.