If you fly to Singapore you may want to try this awesome new attraction in Singapore. While you are there you can smell one iconic fragrance that was re-launched recently: Singapore Girl perfume. In 1983, there was a rough patch in business, like most company’s experience. During this time, Mr. Dadi Balsara created another scent, known as Singapore Bliss, for a company called SIA and was a huge success when launched in 1988. After a long reign of impactful creations, in the year 2000, the now older Mrs. Christina Balsara and wanted to dial down her business to a smaller scale. Finally in 2007, Perfume of Singapore closed down the factories and shut down the business in 2008, and that was the last bit of their iconic presence.

Since its creation, Singapore Girl Perfume has had a beautiful packaging to elevate the experience of the users as well as to make the product stand out. In 1977, Singapore Girl Perfume won the top prize for best design and packaging from the Singapore Manufacturers Association. Singapore Memories knows that a luxurious bottle of perfume makes you feel like a million bucks. There are a million reasons why girls wear Singapore Girl but it boils down to the fact that it makes people happy.

Rasna, a decoction of the roots of A. praemorsa, is a bitter tonic that is considered to be a speci?c remedy for rheumatism in India. Its usage also extends to the treatment of sciatica, neuralgia, syphilis and uterine disorders in the country. The primitive Dongria Kandha tribe from Niyamgiri Hills consume a tablespoon made from the roots of A. praemorsa on an empty stomach, twice daily for 15 days, when they suffer from arthritis. Koya tribe from Andra Pradesh uses the pulverised plant, mixed with egg white and calcium to produce a paste for application on fractured limbs to promote healing. In Nepal, the powdered root of A. praemorsa is used to treat rheumatism or to produce a cooling effect.

Singapore’s oldest nature park is continuously filled with joggers, families and weekend strollers – plus those flocking to see the occasional free concert. You can get into the reservoir’s rainforest via the MacRitchie Trail, which offers straightforward boardwalk treks and more ambitious, longer hikes. There’s plenty of wildlife here, from flying lemurs to tree frogs and pangolins – but they do tend to hide out of sight. The one exception are the long-tailed macaque monkeys that hang about. Be warned, though: having been fed by less responsible visitors, they can be aggressive little terrors. Discover more info at corporate gift singapore.

This colonial building is one of the world’s last grand 19th-century hotels, once visited by literary luminaries such as Rudyard Kipling and Joseph Conrad, as well as movie star Charlie Chaplin. Built in 1887, the property has served as a city landmark for well over a century and continues to live up to its tony reputation with excellent food and service. The classical architecture and tropical gardens provide a refined setting and represent another facet of Singapore’s varied and rich history. The Raffles Hotel Singapore is located in the city’s Colonial District, which is also home to several other historic sites, and a good place to base yourself in the city. Here, you’ll find the Raffles Landing Site, where Sir Stamford Raffles is said to have stepped ashore in 1819. The story has it that he saw the small fishing village but recognized its potential as a port, so he purchased the land from the Sultan of Johor and invited Chinese and Indian immigrants to move here. And so the seeds of Singapore’s multi-ethnic identity were sown.

The treetop walk at MacRitchie Reservoir is a big project and a pioneer of its genre in Singapore. Standing 25 metres high and at 250 metres long, the wooden walkway bridge gives you the opportunity to see Singapore in a different way: without one tall building in sight – just a fantastic panoramic view of the forest with its many interesting animals. It takes at least 3 hours to fully enjoy the treetop walk at a distance of around 7 km. Gardens by the Bay is a huge, colourful, futuristic park in the bay area of Singapore; and has won countless architecture awards. The famous Supertree structures offer an impressive skywalk over the gardens, over-sized seashell-shaped greenhouses recreate chilly mountain climates and there are hundreds of trees and plants to discover, making this destination great fun for both kids and adults.