Kids backpack? This Onya Pure carrier is the newest addition to Onya’s lineup of excellent and versatile baby carriers that are great for longer treks through the great outdoors. Just as the Onya Outback is being phased out, Onya released this awesome Pure model that has similar versatility but with higher breathability and a simpler overall setup. The Onya pure supports newborns as small as 7 pounds and toddlers and bigger kiddos all the way up to 45 pounds. While we don’t suggest trying to lug around a 45-pound kid in a carrier during lengthy hikes, it can make a good back-up when their little legs get tired and they need a little boost. The Pure offers three carry positions: front inward-facing, rear inward-facing, and also hip carrying. In our testing, we found all of the positions pretty comfortable. The carrier offers versatility for strap configuration – you can configure it as an H, or as an X that crosses the straps across the back or chest. We definitely suggest the X cross-strap configuration for higher comfort over longer carries, and it’s a better option for parents who get uncomfortable with the straps rubbing under the arms.

Follow these tips when you decide where to go backpacking for the first time: Consult with experienced backpackers: Hiking club members and REI store staff love to make trip recommendations. Hiking guidebooks are a valuable tool—you’ll find the best selection for a given area in local REI stores and other local outdoor retailers. Online sites like the co-op’s Hiking Project are another great resource. Pick a place close to home. You want to spend more time hiking than driving. You also want to have ample daylight hours to reach camp before dark. Discover additional info on https://www.backpackultra.com/best-carry-on-travel-backpack/.

Sunglasses come in handy when I’m hiking in very bright environments that are pretty common in snow, mountains, and desert conditions. Snow blindness, or photokeratitis, is sun-burn for your eyes, and can happen without snow. I’ve had it; it makes it very hard to see in general. If you’re in bright conditions, sunglasses are a smart move, even if you don’t think you need them. I always bring extra layers in my pack. Clothing is so lightweight and compact-able these days, it’s not a hassle. An easy way to do this is to get pants that convert to shorts. Then use a long-sleeve hiking shirt where you can roll up the sleeves. Bring a fleece layer to top that, and then a lightweight rain shell to cover. If you have all that on, it’ll be like having a winter jacket. A small beanie is light, small, and keeps you warm.

Lowering backpack weight trick : Get a scale. A digital scale is a worthwhile tool to invest in – it can reveal what each item actually “costs” in weight. Knowing the exact weight of your gear and supplies helps you pack more strategically. Cut excess straps. Compression straps, excess hip belt straps, sternum straps, shoulder straps, manufacturer’s logo, anything. You can trim all of these to shed a couple ounces. If you pack your gear right, you won’t even need compression straps. Share the load. Got company on your trip? Consolidate your resources. Chances are you probably don’t need two stoves, two shelters, etc. Take some extra time to distribute and share your gear weight evenly between the members of your group. Read more info at this website.