Why visit Albania 2021? In the north of the country, hidden among the Albanian Alps, there is Theth, one of the most beautiful natural areas of Albania. Theth is the perfect place for hikers and nature lovers because it is located in a dramatic mountainous scenery surrounded by nature and offers a lot of activities to do. The largest town on the southern coast of Albania is Vlora, a city with important historic sites, such as Kanina castle, Zvernec island, and Orikum, but it is mostly known as the town where Albania declared its independence over 100 years ago. From the port of Vlora, every day with the help of Teuta Boat Tours it is possible to reach the fabulous Karaburun Peninsula (and the near Sazan Island).

A Unesco city, Gjirokastra is without a doubt one of the best places to visit in Albania. Unique Ottoman period architecture – with houses designed like small castles – can be found all over Gjirokastra, which has a military museum and art gallery in its amazing castle that dominates the skyline. A folklore festival also takes place in Gjirokastra’s castle every five years – the last one was in 2015. Visiting the old Ottoman bazaar in Gjirokastra should be on the agenda for anyone visiting this part of the country. Gjirokastra is famous as the birthplace of world-renowned author Ismail Kadare and Albania’s former dictator Enver Hoxha – today their old homes are museums.

Widely regarded as one of the prettiest cities in the whole of the Balkans, Berat is known as ‘the Town of a Thousand Windows,’ as so many windows peer out at you from the front of its hillside buildings which are so tightly clustered together. Located on a hillside, there are a number of Ottoman-era mosques and Byzantine churches scattered about town. One of the best views of Berat is from across the banks of the Osumi River which runs through it. While simply wandering around Berat is a lovely way to spend the time, the town also has a great 13th-century hilltop castle, which is worth visiting for the outstanding views. There are also two interesting museums with some fascinating local costumes and artifacts on display and some splendid 16th-century icons. Read more information on weekend in Albania.

Arguably the most significant Saranda tourism highlights are the 40 Saints Monastery. This 6th-century monastery is literally how the city got its name—Saranda means 40 in Greek. It was modified extensively over the next centuries, though. According to the legend, the monastery was built in honor of forty Roman martyrs who wouldn’t renounce their Christian faith and were banished. Because of the remaining war damage, the monastery isn’t in a particularly great state, but just because of its historical importance and wonderful views of Saranda, it’s still worth visiting. If you ask permission from Saranda’s city hall, you can enter the surviving crypt.

Berat is in the middle of Albania and it is believed to be one of the country’s oldest towns. Berat is often known by its nickname – the City of a Thousand Windows – due to its mix of Ottoman and Albanian architecture. Berat’s main tourist site is the 140th century castle, Kalaja, which is still home to hundreds of people. Formerly among the most important Albanian cities of the Ottoman Empire, Berat was added to the list of Unesco World Heritage sites in 2008. The Church of St. Mary of Blachernae is a must-see sight for anyone visiting Berat, as is the Mangalem Quarter. See more information on https://incredible-albania.com/.